‘Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols’- Sex Pistols

In 1977, a little band full of snarky Londoners exploded onto the music scene to release a record that would forever change the very fabric of rock music for decades to come. That band was the Sex Pistols and that record was ‘Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols’, which was a total left turn away from anything that was happening at that moment in time (Although it may be lesser known that ‘Damned Damned Damned’ by the Damned did come out several months prior). However, that record wouldn’t go on to be as culturally significant as this bonafide classic was and is.

From the opening track, “Holidays in the Sun”, this new punk precedent was beginning to expose itself. Within the context of the late-’70s musical climate, it’s commonly known that punk rock came on the scene as an alternative to the disco scene and the increasingly silly progressive rock scene, which was becoming mysteriously¬†diluted and the remains were becoming scattered throughout many different styles throughout popular music. The so called “Golden Age of Rock n’ Roll” had died and things were, in general, being taken over by what would become the yuppie culture. Disco had defeated rock n’ roll, for the time being, and it was this band’s trailblazing offensiveness and innate provocative, collective personality that would push back against this dreary notion. Songs like “God Save the Queen” and “Anarchy in the U.K.” were so blatantly intrusive into the coziness that many of the complacent were occupied with that it had no other path but becoming a blueprint for which the many hordes of the disenfranchised could reclaim the mantle of rock n’ roll music, which is something that, in its very nature, is occupied by these disenfranchised hordes. Of course, this record is highly driven by personality. John Lydon (a.k.a. Johnny Rotten, at this time) has an incredible grasp of the role of the provocative, shocking frontman. The rest of the band is equally locked in, Sid Vicious, in particular, makes absolute perfect use of his near inability to play his instrument. It’s truly beautiful in the ugliest way imaginable. The absolute highlight of the record may be “Bodies”, though, a track that is probably the meanest of all the tracks on the record, albeit a lesser known track.

What can be said about this classic record that hasn’t already been said a million times over? It’s an absolute essential. One of the greatest records of all time. No question. It’s the ultimate testament to the changes in the tide that were occurring at the time of its release. What this record accomplished was bringing these changing tides to the forefront, rather than continuing to allow them to percolate behind the scenes. In this sense, the Sex Pistols are just as culturally significant as Chuck Berry or the Beatles. Of course, with the death of Sid Vicious and John Lydon becoming disillusioned with what the band’s image was becoming, the project was short-lived. What a way to go out, though, for one of the most deliberately controversial bands of all time! This record is absolutely spotless in its own unique way and it clearly isn’t bothered in the least by the condemnations that were tossed upon it, making it, unquestionably, one of the freshest and most trailblazing records in the history of popular music. The cream of the crop.

5/5

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